DairyCast Industry

Anti-Antimicrobials In New York State?


The New York State Senate introduced state legislation that would

make it a misdemeanor to use non-therapeutic antimicrobials in cattle, poultry, sheep, swine or any other animals raised for human food consumption, including animals raised to provide non-meat products like milk and eggs.

How will banning non-therapeutic antimicrobials impact animal agriculture? Such legislation in a major dairy producing state is sure to face strong resistance.

Are Milk Consumption and Cardiovascular Diseases Related?


A recent review of selected research from multiple sources suggests that there is no link between milk consumption and an increase in risk of heart disease, stroke or total mortality.

Via The Times Of India:

Wageningen and Harvard University researchers examined 17 studies from Europe, USA and Japan, and found no link between the consumption of regular or low-fat dairy and any increased risk of heart disease, stroke or total mortality.

The meta-analysis, as reported by the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, concludes:

This dose-response meta-analysis of prospective studies indicates that milk intake is not associated with total mortality but may be inversely associated with overall CVD risk; however, these findings are based on limited numbers.

Can Dairy Reduce Health Risks?


A new report from the the Annuals of Internal Medicine suggests that certain milk products may reduce the risks associated with with diabetes.

A natural substance found in dairy products appears to protect against diabetes, say researchers.

A study of over 3,700 people found higher levels of trans-palmitoleic acid was linked with a reduced risk of type 2 diabetes.

The original report, via the Annuals of Internal Medicine, concludes:

Circulating trans-palmitoleate is associated with lower insulin resistance, presence of atherogenic dyslipidemia, and incident diabetes. Our findings may explain previously observed metabolic benefits of dairy consumption and support the need for detailed further experimental and clinical investigation.

It is not recommended to increase dairy product consumption as a way to reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes.

Cow + Feed=Lots Of Gas


Cows are considered the largest producer of methane globally, according to the US Environmental Protection Agency. The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations has reports stating "The livestock sector is a major player, responsible for 18 percent of greenhouse gas emissions measured in [carbon dioxide] equivalent."

Reduction of methane produced by cows has long been thought to be a key green house gas reduction activity. Recently, Wageningen University researcher Van Zijderveld discovered that nitrate and sulphate additives in feed help reduce methane production in cow stomachs.

If their feed contains a small percentage of these substances the amount of this powerful greenhouse gas produced by sheep is halved, research by Sander van Zijderveld has shown.

While the research is in its early stages, there is potential to reduce methane production 16 to 30 percent.

US Milk Production Up Year Over Year


The USDA reports that milk production data on 23 selected states is up over last year, to 14.4 billion pounds from 13.9 billion pounds in 2009.

The number of milk cows on farms in the 23 major states was 8.37 million head, 57,000 head more than November 2009, but unchanged from October 2010. Wisconsin was milking about 1.26 million head of dairy cattle during the month, with total production averaging 1,630 pounds per cow for the month--which was about the same as last year's average for November. The national per-cow average was up 41 pound at 1,722 pounds per animal.

Additional information and data from the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service Milk Production web page.

Global Food Prices Expected To Increase In 2011


According to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) food prices in 2011 are expected to increase.

In the latest edition of its Food Outlook report, the agency also issued a warning to the international community to prepare for harder times ahead unless production of major food crops increases significantly in 2011.

The report, at 119 pages, covers many aspects of global agriculture, with data on all the main agricultural products and statistics on key countries.

The increase in international prices of food commodities, all of which accruing in the second half of 2010, is boosting the overall food import bill in 2010 closer to the peak reached in 2008.

“Given the expectation of falling global inventories, the size of next year’s crops will be critical in setting the tone for stability in international markets,” FAO said. “For major cereals, production must expand substantially to meet utilization and to reconstitute world reserves, and farmers are likely to respond to the prevailing prices by expanding plantings.

Top Entry Level Ag Jobs?


Getting ready to graduate in an agricultural related field? Iowa State University Agriculture and Life Sciences Careers Services released its report 09/10 Entry-level Salary Information for Recent Graduates in Agriculture and Related Disciplines. Top paying job titles? Quality Assurance/Control, Packaging Engineer, Precision Ag Specialist, Engineer, Conservation/Environmental Technician.

The complete report offers data on degree, organization hiring that degree, salary ranges, and universities that participated in the survey.

RFA View On Fueling Ethanol


Matt Hartwig, The Renewable Fuels Association (RFA), shares thoughts on legislation supporting the Volumetric Ethanol Excise Tax Credit (aka VEETC) and possible changes in 2011.

Does Media Present Science Fairly?


Science in the media can be very hard to explain. This is especially true when the topic, like genetically modified organisms (GMO), is very technical, not very sexy, or controversial. In the case of GMOs, some media outlets cater to the confusion and aim to be sensational. Unfortunately, this approach distorts the facts and may cause consumers to make inaccurate statements about what they eat, buy, or recommend.

On December 7, 2010, Dr. Pamela Ronald, a distinguished plant scientist at the University of California – Davis, appeared as guest expert on the nationally-syndicated “Dr. Oz Show” to discuss the benefits of GMOs.

Unfortunately, what “played out” was way past disappointing. There was unbelievable bias in how the segment was edited to produce the “final” version that overshadowed the sound scientific facts about GMOs. I found it remarkable that much of what Dr. Ronald presented during the filming of the segment was edited “out” of the final version of the show!

It is important to understand how media uses fear, uncertainty, and doubt (FUD) to derail constructive conversations about complicated subjects. Learn more from Dr. Terry Etherton and his response to the producers of the Dr. Oz Show.

Livestock Operations Need To Open To Public


Temple Grandin says livestock ranchers should open their doors to the public and show how animals are raised and cared for.

She urged farmers and ranchers to fill that information gap, and to use the Internet as a tool for demonstrating their animal-care practices. For example, she commended a California egg farm that has begun streaming live video of its chickens online.

Temple Grandin, a professor at Colorado State University, made these comments during a presentation the California Farm Bureau Federation Annual Meeting in Monterey, California.

Grandin described Americans as "hungry for information" about what happens on farms and ranches. She noted the popularity of TV shows such as "Dirty Jobs" and others on trucking and logging that have showcased aspects of agriculture.

"Most of the public is just curious," Grandin said. "We need to be opening up the door and showing the things that we do."

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