health & disease

Dr. Scott Brown - Challenges in Antibiotic Product Development in a Rapidly Changing Global Landscape


Challenges in Antibiotic Product Development in a Rapidly Changing Global Landscape - Dr. Scott Brown, Senior Director of Metabolism and Safety, Pfizer Animal Health, from the 2011 Antibiotic Use In Food Animals conference, October 26-27, 2011, Chicago, IL, USA.

Dr. Scott Hurd - Welcome and Purpose of Symposium


Welcome and Purpose of Symposium - Dr. Scott Hurd, Associate Professor, Iowa State University, from the 2011 Antibiotic Use In Food Animals conference, October 26-27, 2011, Chicago, IL, USA.

Dr. Robert Flamm - The Challenge of Antimicrobial Resistance in Human Health


The Challenge of Antimicrobial Resistance in Human Health - Dr. Robert Flamm, Director of Antimicrobial Development, JMI Laboratories, from the 2011 Antibiotic Use In Food Animals conference, October 26-27, 2011, Chicago, IL, USA.

2011 NIAA Antibiotic Use In Food Animals

2011 NIAA Antibiotic Use In Food Animals 2011 NIAA Antibiotic Use In Food Animals The use of antibiotics in animal agriculture fuels discussion based on few facts and much misinformation. Dispel many of those myths as you review these presentations from the National Institute for Animal Agriculture's 2011 Antibiotic Use In Food Animals conference, held October 26-27, 2011, Chicago, IL, USA.

Approaches To Forage and Hay

forage and hay
Forage / hay quality and availability is tight this year. Many operations are facing tough decisions on acquiring feed options. If you are faced with using lower quality forage or hay, this post will help in identifying the quality and storage options for fall and winter.
The quality of the hay will vary greatly, depending on the time of year, maturity and weather conditions when the hay was made in addition to how it is stored. While we encourage forage testing as the only real way of knowing the feed value of your hay, very few farmers are following through with this practice.

Calculating The Cost of Weathered Hay


The value of hay this year is much higher due to the drought in many parts of the country. This calculator can help farmers discover the value of hay, especially weathered hay that may have damage.

From the Cattle Network:
This is a quick tool that can be used to determine if older hay really is the bargain it appears to be. The calculator can also be used to determine the amount of additional hay that is necessary to meet the cow herd winter requirements after accounting for the inedible portion of the hay.

Is Weather Driving Your Cows to Slaughter?

Pushing Cows To Slaughter
Audio via DairyCast.com

Drought and forecasts for little rain and high feed prices pressure producers into herd liquidation.  Darrell Peel, Oklahoma State livestock economist, discusses how and when to move your steers under these conditions.
What are the options available and how to get through the winter?

Is the US milk supply at risk?


Where does milk come from besides "cows"? This maps shows that 50% of US milk comes from a small number of counties.
If a dairy disease outbreak occurs in relatively few regions in the country, this would have a huge impact on milk production and availability to consumers throughout the country.

Dr. Terry Etherton highlights that these concentrations are a risk from a disease outbreak point of view, and also from bioterrorism point of view.

Milk Goes Bad in High Heat!

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The midwest is experiencing high heat and humidity this summer. These high temperatures not only make you feel terrible but your livestock can feel bad too. It is important to keep an eye on the animals and take action before they start to get heat stress.

 

Heat stress can greatly impact cattle producers through decreased milk production and subsequent calf growth, decreased reproductive performance in cows and bulls, and decreased stocker and feeder performance.

This article provides straight forward information on identifying heat stress and tactics to keep animals cool.

Dr. Larry Hollis, cattle vet at K-State, also offers some approaches to reducing heat stress in cattle (audio link).

How Much Food Will Be Needed In 2050?

There have been many articles that compare the population of 2050 and the food requirements needed by that population. Examples include "Making Safe, Abundant Food Supply a Global Reality" and "Food Needs and Population" (additional resources). Dr. Terry Etherton highlights some of the approaches to population estimates and then seeks to translate into the quantity of food that would be needed to feed that 2050 population.
The question emerges, then, of whether there is more accurate approach for estimating projected food needs in 2050?
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