media

Working With Media: It Can Be A Slimy Business

Media Deconstruction On Agriculture Stories
Video via DairyCast.com
Agriculture has been in the main stream media several times this year. Janie Gabbett, Meatingplace Executive Editor, provides a perspective on where people get their news, how stories about agriculture spread, and what farmers and ranchers need to be aware of.

Helena Bottemiller - Agriculture’s Voice in Today’s Media


Agriculture’s Voice in Today’s Media - Helena Bottemiller, Food Safety News Washington Correspondent, from the Animal Ag Alliance Stakeholders Summit, Real Farmers Real Food, Celebrating Tradition and Technology, May 2-3, Arlington, VA, USA.

Janie Gabbett - Media Deconstruction On Agriculture Stories


Agriculture’s Voice in Today’s Media - Janie Gabbett, Meatingplace Executive Editor, from the Animal Ag Alliance Stakeholders Summit, Real Farmers Real Food, Celebrating Tradition and Technology, May 2-3, Arlington, VA, USA.

How Can Policy Makers Learn More About Animal Science?

Animal Frontiers The American Society of Animal Science (ASAS), Canadian Society of Animal Science (CSAS), and the European Federation of Animal Science (EAAP) launched a new print publication at the Joint Association Meeting (JAM) in New Orleans. Animal Frontiers aims to help bring animal science information to a broad audience with concise and focused series four times a year.
Each issue of Animal Frontiers will address a common theme with leading authors in those areas addressing various aspects of the theme. Animal Frontiers is published quarterly with an intended international readership of scientists, politicians, industry leaders and the general public seeking a scientific perspective on issues related to animal agriculture.

Does Media Present Science Fairly?


Science in the media can be very hard to explain. This is especially true when the topic, like genetically modified organisms (GMO), is very technical, not very sexy, or controversial. In the case of GMOs, some media outlets cater to the confusion and aim to be sensational. Unfortunately, this approach distorts the facts and may cause consumers to make inaccurate statements about what they eat, buy, or recommend.

On December 7, 2010, Dr. Pamela Ronald, a distinguished plant scientist at the University of California – Davis, appeared as guest expert on the nationally-syndicated “Dr. Oz Show” to discuss the benefits of GMOs.

Unfortunately, what “played out” was way past disappointing. There was unbelievable bias in how the segment was edited to produce the “final” version that overshadowed the sound scientific facts about GMOs. I found it remarkable that much of what Dr. Ronald presented during the filming of the segment was edited “out” of the final version of the show!

It is important to understand how media uses fear, uncertainty, and doubt (FUD) to derail constructive conversations about complicated subjects. Learn more from Dr. Terry Etherton and his response to the producers of the Dr. Oz Show.

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