research science

DairyCast 0420 - Does Methane Production Vary By Individual Cow?

DairyCast 0420 Show Notes:
  • Walking the tradeshow floor at the American Dairy Science Association joint meeting with the American Society of Animal Scientists, Truffle Media's John Blue happens upon a new process to monitor methane production on individual cows.  It's another tool in your herd management toolbox... coming soon!

How Can Policy Makers Learn More About Animal Science?

Animal Frontiers The American Society of Animal Science (ASAS), Canadian Society of Animal Science (CSAS), and the European Federation of Animal Science (EAAP) launched a new print publication at the Joint Association Meeting (JAM) in New Orleans. Animal Frontiers aims to help bring animal science information to a broad audience with concise and focused series four times a year.
Each issue of Animal Frontiers will address a common theme with leading authors in those areas addressing various aspects of the theme. Animal Frontiers is published quarterly with an intended international readership of scientists, politicians, industry leaders and the general public seeking a scientific perspective on issues related to animal agriculture.

Dr. Pam Hullinger - FMD Vaccination as One Potential Control Measure During an FMD Outbreak Response


FMD Vaccination as One Potential Control Measure During an FMD Outbreak Response - Dr. Pam Hullinger, DVM, MPVM, DACVPM, Department of Veterinary Medicine and Epidemiology, University of California-Davis, from the 2011 Annual Conference of the National Institute for Animal Agriculture, April 11 - 14, San Antonio, TX USA.

DairyCast 0410 - A New Tool In Your Air Emissions Toolbox Shows Promise

DairyCast 0410 Show Notes:
  • Bruce Cochrane shares a conversation on promising research to limit air emissions through the use of nanoparticle technology.

100 Questions That Can Change Agriculture


Many organizations are stating that by 2050 there will be 9 billion people on Earth and that agriculture must change to be able to produce enough food for this growing population.

Despite a significant growth in food production over the past half-century, one of the most important challenges facing society today is how to feed an expected population of some nine billion by the middle of the 20th century.

The top 100 questions of importance to the future of global agriculture is the result of research and focused conversations about the global issues, agriculture, and being able to meet the food needs of the world.

The aim is to use sound scientific evidence to inform decision making and guide policy makers in the future direction of agricultural research priorities and policy support. If addressed, we anticipate that these questions will have a significant impact on global agricultural practices worldwide, while improving the synergy between agricultural policy, practice and research. This research forms part of the UK Government's Foresight Global Food and Farming Futures project.

DairyCast 0402 - Will New Anaerobic Digester Technology Pay?

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mp3DairyCast 0402 Show Notes:

  • President of DGH Engineering, Dennis Hodgkinson talks with Canadian correspondent Bruce Cochrane about the company's new digester technology. 

Cow + Feed=Lots Of Gas


Cows are considered the largest producer of methane globally, according to the US Environmental Protection Agency. The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations has reports stating "The livestock sector is a major player, responsible for 18 percent of greenhouse gas emissions measured in [carbon dioxide] equivalent."

Reduction of methane produced by cows has long been thought to be a key green house gas reduction activity. Recently, Wageningen University researcher Van Zijderveld discovered that nitrate and sulphate additives in feed help reduce methane production in cow stomachs.

If their feed contains a small percentage of these substances the amount of this powerful greenhouse gas produced by sheep is halved, research by Sander van Zijderveld has shown.

While the research is in its early stages, there is potential to reduce methane production 16 to 30 percent.

How Can Bacteriophages Perform As Antibiotic Alternatives?

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Bacteriophages are being considered as viable alternatives to infectious diseases that are no longer responding to antibiotics. Currently waiting U.S. approval, bacteriophages could be used to treat animals and humans.

Bacteriophages -- so named when they were first discovered because they appear to eat bacteria -- are naturally occurring viruses that can infect and kill bacteria.

Currently there are many bacterial diseases that have become resistant to antibiotics. Stronger antibiotics have been used in treatment but at the risk of continue the evolution of the bacteria to become "super-bugs".

Fast forward to the present, where an increasing number of bacteria strains -- often referred to as "super bugs" -- are becoming resistant to antibiotics typically used against them. The fear of seeing human medical science being hurled back into a pre-antibiotic era is ever present.

In the battle against antibiotic resistance in animal agriculture, researchers from Washington and New York states are hoping to help pave the way for U.S. approval of a promising biological therapy that has the potential to not only treat sick cows, but also save human lives threatened by infectious diseases that no longer respond to antibiotics.

Anti-Posilac Billboard Campaign Rejected

BAC Versus Lilly
Article via indystar.com

The Breast Cancer Action group wants to post its opinion about Eli Lilly and Company's Posilac on Indianapolis billboards but finds it difficult find a vendor to take on the billboard campaign.

When billboard companies in the city rejected the group's message, [Breast Cancer Action] cried foul, implying it's impossible to criticize Lilly in Indianapolis. Officials of Lamar Advertising, however, say they'd be glad to run the group's claims. If it can prove them.

The Breast Cancer Action group claims Posilac, a recombinant bovine growth hormone (aka rBGH or rVST), is passed to humans through milk and is linked to cancer. Lilly's Elanco division disputes the claim.

"There is no scientific backing for their position,'' [Joan] Todd [Lilly spokeswoman] said of the health group. "This is one of the most studied and restudied products on the market. Drinking milk does not increase the risk of breast cancer."

What's That Smell? Biofilter To Reduce Odor

What is that smell?

Ted Funk, a University of Illinois Extension agricultural engineer with the Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering (ABE), and Matt Robert, an ABE research engineer, constructed two biofilters on the ABE research farm to reduce odor emissions by up to 90%.

"The new design uses 30-inch concrete silo staves that fit together like puzzle pieces," said Robert.

The biofilters media is expected to last between three and five years and cost about dollar per cubic foot per minute (cfm) of air handled.

"Reducing odor and being a good neighbor sound good until it comes to the pocketbook," said Funk. "Biofiltration has been around a long time in other industries, but it's never been brought down to a cost that the livestock industry can handle."

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