weather

DairyCast Update for June 21, 2012, Farm Bill Passes Senate - With What?

Information To Help Your Operations

  • Audio: Farm Bill Passes Senate Without HSUS-Egg Amendment - Troy Dumler, Economist, Kansas State, discusses the details in the recently passed Senate version of the 2012 U.S. Farm Bill. The HSUS-UEP Egg Bill amendment did not get added to the passed version while direct payments were replaced with additional crop insurance support [audio].
  • Video: How To Look At The Weather - While this presentation is from the World Pork Expo, the topic and information are just as valuable to you on dairy farms: weather. High temperatures across the USA have been a departure from the 1981 2010 average. The persistent heat from the summer of 2011 had more than 70 days over 100 degrees in some spots across the USA and every state has had temps over 100 degrees. What are the impacts on agriculture going forward? What should we do? Dr.

Dr. Elwynn Taylor - Weather Outlook


Weather Outlook - Dr. Elwynn Taylor, Climatologist, Ag Meteorologist, Iowa State University, from the 2012 World Pork Expo, June 6-8, Des Moines, Iowa, USA.

DairyCast 0440 - Supplement Your Crop Insurance Program With Weather Coverage From The Climate Corporation

DairyCast 0440 Show Notes:

DairyCast 0430 - Forage Overview From World Dairy Expo

DairyCast 0430 Show Notes:
  • This conversation with Mycogen Seeds customer agronomist Jon Erickson overviews comments from World Dairy Expo, outcomes from the forage contest and takes in production issues across the growing region.

Is Weather Driving Your Cows to Slaughter?

Pushing Cows To Slaughter
Audio via DairyCast.com

Drought and forecasts for little rain and high feed prices pressure producers into herd liquidation.  Darrell Peel, Oklahoma State livestock economist, discusses how and when to move your steers under these conditions.
What are the options available and how to get through the winter?

Milk Goes Bad in High Heat!

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The midwest is experiencing high heat and humidity this summer. These high temperatures not only make you feel terrible but your livestock can feel bad too. It is important to keep an eye on the animals and take action before they start to get heat stress.

 

Heat stress can greatly impact cattle producers through decreased milk production and subsequent calf growth, decreased reproductive performance in cows and bulls, and decreased stocker and feeder performance.

This article provides straight forward information on identifying heat stress and tactics to keep animals cool.

Dr. Larry Hollis, cattle vet at K-State, also offers some approaches to reducing heat stress in cattle (audio link).

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